Element 68Element 45Element 44Element 63Element 64Element 43Element 41Element 46Element 47Element 69Element 76Element 62Element 61Element 81Element 82Element 50Element 52Element 79Element 79Element 7Element 8Element 73Element 74Element 17Element 16Element 75Element 13Element 12Element 14Element 15Element 31Element 32Element 59Element 58Element 71Element 70Element 88Element 88Element 56Element 57Element 54Element 55Element 18Element 20Element 23Element 65Element 21Element 22iconsiconsElement 83iconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsiconsElement 84iconsiconsElement 36Element 35Element 1Element 27Element 28Element 30Element 29Element 24Element 25Element 2Element 1Element 66
Social Media in Situations of Crises and Catastrophes

Social Media in Situations of Crises and Catastrophes

The change of the public sphere, to which social web services such as networking platforms, weblogs and microblogs contribute, does also affect communication in the event of a crisis or catastrophe. Beforehand, social web applications are mainly relevant an additional channel for general preparatory information on how to behave in the event of a crisis. During a crisis or a natural disaster (such as hurricanes, floods, or earthquakes) social web applications support the "situational awareness” of affected persons, but also for crisis committees, who can get hold of eyewitness accounts. Communication offerings of professional media and official institutions are important, also because users further distribute their content.

After a crisis, personal public spheres in the social web may contribute to people handling their experiences, grieving, and mentally coping with their experiences. Also in order to mobilise support or raise donations, in part even on a worldwide scale, Facebook and Twitter are being used. Problems and barriers of using the social web in crises scenarios can result from the disparate spreading and lacking trust in the public. The extension of information sources in the social web can also bring orientation problems through intransparent, redundant, or contradictory information.

show more

Project Description

The change of the public sphere, to which social web services such as networking platforms, weblogs and microblogs contribute, does also affect communication in the event of a crisis or catastrophe. Beforehand, social web applications are mainly relevant an additional channel for general preparatory information on how to behave in the event of a crisis. During a crisis or a natural disaster (such as hurricanes, floods, or earthquakes) social web applications support the "situational awareness” of affected persons, but also for crisis committees, who can get hold of eyewitness accounts. Communication offerings of professional media and official institutions are important, also because users further distribute their content.

After a crisis, personal public spheres in the social web may contribute to people handling their experiences, grieving, and mentally coping with their experiences. Also in order to mobilise support or raise donations, in part even on a worldwide scale, Facebook and Twitter are being used. Problems and barriers of using the social web in crises scenarios can result from the disparate spreading and lacking trust in the public. The extension of information sources in the social web can also bring orientation problems through intransparent, redundant, or contradictory information.

Project Information

Overview

Duration: 2011-2011

Involved persons

Dr. Jan-Hinrik Schmidt

Cooperation Partner

Contact person

Dr. Jan-Hinrik Schmidt
Senior Researcher Digital Interactive Media & Political Communication

Dr. Jan-Hinrik Schmidt

Leibniz-Institut für Medienforschung | Hans-Bredow-Institut (HBI)
Rothenbaumchaussee 36
20148 Hamburg

Tel. +49 (0)40 45 02 17-83
Fax +49 (0)40 45 02 17-77

Send Mail

MAYBE YOU ARE ALSO INTERESTED IN THESE TOPICS?

Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter and receive the Institute's latest news via email.

SUBSCRIBE!