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Matthias C. Kettemann in World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology

Matthias C. Kettemann in World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology

The Secretary-General of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization UNESCO has appointed Prof. Matthias C. Kettemann, head of an HBI research programme, as one of 18 experts on the World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology (COMEST) 
The World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology has been advising UNESCO on important future issues since 1998. Its main tasks include recognizing early signs of risk situations, advising decision-makers on questions of scientific ethics and promoting global dialogue on the ethical embedding of new technologies.

Matthias C. Kettemann will now be part of this commission for four years. All 18 members are selected globally from outstanding personalities from the fields of science, engineering, law, philosophy, culture, religion or politics. Matthias C. Kettemann was nominated by the Austrian Foreign Ministry.
What rules does the quantum age need?
"We will first deal with ethical issues in quantum science," says Matthias C. Kettemann. "The World Commission on the Ethics of Scientific Knowledge and Technology has distinguished itself in recent years with recommendations on the ethics of artificial intelligence, robotics and the Internet of Things. Now it's the turn of quantum research.

Prof. Kettemann is head of the research program "Regulatory Structures and the Emergence of Rules in Online Spaces" at the Leibniz Institute for Media Research and head of the Department of Legal Theory and Future of Law at the University of Innsbruck.

(Hamburg, 19 June 2024)

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